So, How Did They Do?

Earlier I had listed those Olympic athletes who were the sole representatives of their countries in Sochi. Given that the 2014 Winter Olympics are over, I thought it would be interesting to see how they did.

Note that when I give a result of, for example, 52nd of 60, that 60 refers to the number of athletes who crossed the finish line. It does not include all the DNSs, DNFs, and DSQs.

DNS; Did Not Start – For whatever reason, the athlete declined to compete. I’m going to assume it was due to illness and not something like equipment failure or not being there at the start when the race / their run was scheduled to begin. Olympic athletes have been known to share equipment when someone forgets to bring spares. And missing your start time is something too embarrassing to contemplate.

DNF: Did Not Finish – The athlete started, but did not cross the finish line. Perhaps they got hurt along the way, or were so far behind that they decided to save their strength for another competition.

DSQ: Disqualified – For whatever reason, they were either not allowed to compete or their results were wiped. Perhaps they ran afoul of one of the many obscure rules governing the Olympic version of their sport. Happily, there are very, very few of these. And none from our “soloists”


Dow Travers, Cayman Islands (alpine skiing):

Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: DNF
Men’s Slalom – Run 1: 76th out of 77
Men’s Slalom – Run 2: DNF

Elise Pellegrin, Malta (alpine skiing):

Women’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: 72nd of 74
Women’s Giant Slalom – Run 2: 64th of 67
Women’s Slalom – Run 1: 52nd of 60
Women’s Slalom – Run 2: 39th of 49

Michael Christian Martinez, Philippines (figure skating):

Men’s Short Program: 19th of 29
Men’s Free Skating: 20th of 24

Tucker Murphy, Bermuda (cross-country skiing):

Men’s 15 km Classic: 84th of 87

Peter Crook, British Virgin Islands (freestyle skiing):

Men’s Ski Halfpipe Qualification: 27th of 28

Kari Peters, Luxembourg (cross-country skiing):

Men’s Sprint Free Qualification: 79th of 85

Lui Pan-To Barton, Hong Kong (speed skating):

Men’s 1500m Heats: 5th, did not advance

Bruno Banani, Tonga (luge):

Men’s Singles – Run 1: 34th of 39
Men’s Singles – Run 2: 33rd of 39
Men’s Singles – Run 3: 30th of 39
Men’s Singles – Run 4: 32nd of 39

Evgeniy Timofev, Kyrgyzstan (alpine skiing):

Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: 68th of 79
Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 2: 63rd of 72
Men’s Slalom – Run 1: 73rd of 77
Men’s Slalom – Run 2: 41st of 43

(In my earlier list, I had misidentified the athlete from Kyrgyzstan. My apologies.)

Hubertus von Hohenlohe, Mexico (alpine skiing):

Men’s Slalom – Run 1: DNF

(Sadly, this may be the last for the Most Interesting Olympic Athlete. By the time the next Winter Olympics roll around, he’ll be 59…)

Dachhiri Sherpa, Nepal (cross-country skiing):

Men’s 15 km Classic: 86th of 87

Muhammad Karim, Pakistan (alpine skiing):

Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: 77th of 79
Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 2: 71st of 72

Luke Steyn, Zimbabwe (alpine skiing):

Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: 61st of 79
Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 2: 57th of 72
Men’s Slalom – Run 1: DNF

Yohan Goutt Goncalves, Timor-Leste (alpine skiing):

Men’s Slalom – Run 1: 77th of 77
Men’s Slalom – Run 2: 43rd of 43

Alisher Qudratov, Tajikistan (alpine skiing):

Men’s Slalom – Run 1: DNF

Julia Marino, Paraguay (freestyle skiing):

Ladies’ Ski Slopestyle Qualification: 17th of 22

Antonio Jose Pardo Andretta, Venezuela (alpine skiing):

Men’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: DNF

Jasmine Campbell, Virgin Islands (alpine skiing):

Women’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: 62nd of 74
Women’s Giant Slalom – Run 2: 57th of 67
Women’s Slalom – Run 1: 50nd of 60
Women’s Slalom – Run 2: 43rd of 49

And now, the athletes from the other countries making their first appearance at the Winter Olympics.

Dominica

Angelica di Silvestri (cross-country skiing):

Ladies’ 10 km Classic: DNS

Gary di Silvestri (cross-country skiing):

Men’s 15 km Classic: DNF

(That’s got to hurt…..)

Togo

Alessia Afi Dipol (alpine skiing)

Women’s Giant Slalom – Run 1: 60th of 74
Women’s Giant Slalom – Run 2: 53rd of 67
Women’s Slalom – Run 1: DNF

Mathilde-Amivi Petitjean (cross-country skiing):

Women’s 10 km Classic: 68th of 75

Among all the many DNFs and DNSs and DSQs in the official results, you might have noticed a “LAP”. This is the most depressing result possible. It belongs to cross-country skier Jun-Ho Hwang of South Korea. In the Men’s Skiathlon 15 km Classic + 15 km Free, he came in near the end of the 68 entrants after the first half. But in the second half, he fell so far behind that the officials ended the race before he crossed the finish line. Basically, he was told to stop. As a result, he did not get an official time recorded. It’s as if he was never there.

At least he wasn’t done competing. A few days later, he took part in the Men’s 15 km Classic, and finished 68th of 87. And ahead of five skiers who didn’t finish at all.

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